How Less is Running Me

Kyle Reed // @kylereed

I never subscribed to the model of less is more. In college I would always write the maximum amount of pages or words so that I could overwhelm my professor into giving me an A. I would add as much glitz and glamor to designs and graphics as possible to prove that I worked hard on the project. I would leave long comments on blogs, write long blog post to cover all the angles. I truly did not believe in less is more. That was until a couple of weeks ago.

“Just because you can write more doesn’t mean you should.” —>Seth Godin (found here)

Over the last two weeks I have been having a lot of tough conversations. I have wrote several blog post here that can kind of give a glimpse into where I have been, figuring out what is next, and even the idea of the next chapter of life. What I am realizing more and more is that I have a lot of noise in my life. One of those was discussed on Monday, how blogging has become an idol in my life. One of the main things that I realized the most about my blogging every day was that I was putting a lot of content out there but was not necessarily providing value. Seth punched me in the gut, and honestly I thought he was talking about me. Sometimes I write and I should not, sometimes I create and I should not, sometimes I respond and I should not.

I wonder how our content can get better if we cut out all the crap that we write and let the good stuff rise to the top.

*kyle

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Kyle Reed

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Kyle Reed is a connector looking to connect with others. A 20 Something that is blogging his way through life and looking to connect through community. Also a team member of the 8BIT Network and brand evangelist. Find me on twitter: @kylelreed, lets chat.
  • http://www.austinklee.com @austinklee

    Sometimes its avoiding hitting the publish button. I think I have something like 15 posts on my blog sitting in the “Draft” status. They just aren’t “ready” yet.

    I know some people (Jon Acuff) say that you should go ahead and publish if its not perfect, but that’s not why I don’t hit the button.

    Sometimes its because I saw someone else tackle the issue better than me, or maybe I am being too quick to tap out a post on a controversial issue and want to make sure I have the facts just right before I become a blow hard.

    Let me paraphrase the Apostle Paul: All things are publishable, but not all things should be published.

    • http://thoughtsaboutnothing.com Kyle Reed

      Love that, I think Paul would say that.

      Sometimes I wonder if we should let post “breathe” for a couple of days before hitting publish?

  • http://www.lightherlamp.com Jaycee

    I read the post by Seth yesterday. I agree with him, because at the end of the day it is your highlighted points that people will remember, not the entirety of the post. That being said, you can’t always shorten your posts…it depends on how important a particular paragraph is to you, to decide whether to leave it or to scrap it.

    • http://thoughtsaboutnothing.com Kyle Reed

      Did you see what he said about magazine style content?
      I think he is on to something there.

  • http://www.dannyjbixby.com Danny Bixby

    If you’re going to try to emulate someone, there are choices that are much worse than Seth Godin. ;)

    • http://thoughtsaboutnothing.com Kyle Reed

      ya, not a bad guy to follow.

  • http://www.chasechristy.com Chase Christy

    One angle to consider is that sometimes writing a lot leads into the good stuff. When I am writing a lot of music, I am much more inclined to stumbling across some good ones. When I am out of practice, the rust effect overwhelms the oil of smooth success.

    • http://thoughtsaboutnothing.com Kyle Reed

      totally agree. I have done that when I am writing sermons and lessons. I find that the more I write the good stuff eventually comes out. But I am trying to find what it means to say just enough to convey a point but not so much that the point gets lost in the content.